ECA Annual Report 2019-2020


 

Table of Contents
  • Mission, Vision, and Guiding Statements
  • Superintendent’s Annual Summary Report
  • MSA/CIS Re-Accreditation Report
  • ECA Goals for 2020-2021
  • Elementary Principal’s Report
  • Secondary Principal’s Report
  • Secondary School Counselor’s Report
  • Secondary School Counsellor’s University Report
  • Athletic/Sports Report
  • Curriculum and Professional Learning Report
  • Technology Report
  • Library/Media Centre Report
  • Board Education Committee Report
  • Board Finance Committee Report
  • Board Human Resources Committee Report
  • Professional Development Summary

ECA MISSION STATEMENT:
ECA is an inclusive learning community that encourages students to be compassionate, lifelong learners, responsible global citizens, and champions of their individual success.

ECA VISION STATEMENT:
ECA will empower students to strive for excellence through academic, personal, and social growth within a safe, trusting, and enduring environment in order to achieve their full potential.

Approved by the ECA Board of Directors June 13, 2019

GUIDING STATEMENTS:

ECA is an international Nursery to Grade 12 school. Until Grade 10 the school’s well-articulated curriculum taught in English, is based on the US Common Core standards. Students in grades 11 and 12, have the opportunity to fully participate in the IB Diploma Program or complete the ECA High School Diploma. ECA has a well established university and career guidance program.

ECA PROVIDES:

● An inclusive, safe, trusting and stable learning environment

● English and Spanish language support

● Adequate resources to sustain the school’s mission and vision

ECA is a learning community with a common mission focusing on collaboration and teamwork. Faculty and staff work together to achieve annual school-wide goals.

ECA is accredited by the Middle States Association (MSA) and the Council of International Schools (CIS)

TEACHING AND LEARNING AT ECA:

– Instructional strategies and teaching methodologies are centered around current best educational research-based practice.

– Inquiry-based learning activities are designed to be engaging, enjoyable, creative, authentic, innovative, collaborative, data-driven, and effectively utilize technology.

– Focuses on meeting individual student learning needs.

– Teachers professionally reflect on their own teaching practice in order to improve student learning, performance, and growth.

– Involves a regular review of curriculum, teaching instruction, assessment, and learning.

ECA STUDENTS:

– Are supported and encouraged to fulfill their academic, personal, social and emotional potential.

– Are encouraged to participate in artistic, athletic, multicultural and service learning activities.

– Are resilient, leaders, risk takers and innovators.

– Are prepared for academic and non-academic experiences and for the challenges of becoming global citizens and completing university studies.

ECA develops ‘The Whole Person’, using Campo Way and IB Learner Profile Attributes, through:

● Acquiring the following skills: Reflection, analysis, critical thinking, creativity, communication, and collaboration
● Promoting high ethical standards
● Developing personal and social responsibility, self-confidence and emotional growth
● Realizing student self-potential and holistic development
● Promoting a positive “I can do/succeed growth mindset”
● Promoting respect for self and others
● Teaching students to make appropriate choices
● Fostering a commitment of service to help others
● Encouraging students to be industrious, honest and happy

Internationalism/Interculturalism/Global Citizens Involves:
● Understanding one’s own and other cultures through learning about language, diversity, society, culture, history, and arts promoting inclusion
● Promoting collaboration
● Encouraging learning about and understanding of global issues
● Promote helping others within and outside the ECA community
● Being respectful of diverse ideas and beliefs

High-Quality Learning Involves:
● Instruction and learning practices focusing on improving student learning and achievement
● Preparing students for the IB or the ECA High School diploma
● Preparing students to become independent lifelong learners
● Promoting academic success, high personal commitment and achievement
● Teaching and learning which engages students as inquirers and thinkers
● Teaching and learning which fosters participation in experiential learning

Revised and Approved by ECA Board of Directors June 13, 2019

SUPERINTENDENT’S ANNUAL SUMMARY REPORT – TERRY CHRISTIAN

ECA’s EDUCATIONAL GOALS FOR 2019-2020

Overarching School Wide Goal:
– Obtain a successful outcome from the MIddle States Association (MSA) and the Council of International Schools (CIS) Visiting Team Re-accreditation planned for March 2020.

ECA will also focus on four (4) school wide learning goals which provide logical development to ECA’s ongoing educational goals:

1. Integrate explicit literacy instruction across all subjects

2. Use varied standard based Performance Assessments so that students continue to have multiple ways to demonstrate successful learning.

3. Use internal and external data analysis to improve student learning and growth.

4. Ensure that students and faculty effectively use technology, knowledge and skills to support student learning and growth.

The ECA Board of Directors have identified the following eight strategic objectives which ECA shall focus on until June 2023:

1. Maintain, Develop and Improve the Quality of ECA’s International Education
2. Maintain, Develop and Improve Student Learning
3. Maintain/Increase Enrollment
4. Maintain and Develop a Like-Minded Supportive Community
5. Maintain Financial Independence and Provision for Emergency Situations
6. Keep Tuition Affordable
7. Continue to Collaborate and Interact with Other International Schools and Organizations
8. Maintain ECA’s International Accreditation Status

During the academic year 2019-2020 ECA shall also focus on:

– Fostering positive relationships with international university admission offices so that ECA graduates are able to continue to successfully transition to higher learning destinations which best fit their learning needs.

– Retaining and attracting the best qualified and committed international and local faculty.

– Developing the school website and effectively using social media to enhance communication, public relations and marketing.

The school year started smoothly with six overseas and five local new faculty working together to experience how the ECA community professionally functioned. Until March 13, 2020 we offered a complete ECA program and then operated with online distance learning appropriately modified programs and instruction due to the government mandated COVID 19 quarantine restrictions before finishing school one week earlier than planned on June 5, 2020.

Student Protection Policy (SPP), Code of Conduct, Emergency Drills and Substance Use Education: During September and October community meetings were held to explain the SPP and the Code of Conduct, how emergency drills functioned and to answer questions and address areas of particular concern. In addition substance use information sessions were offered, using Dr. Salmen and Dr. Montiel for secondary school students and all parents. In February 2020 the substance use information sessions were repeated for students in grades 4 and 5.

Enrollment and Admissions: Open House admissions events, increased social media postings and cultural events were actively supported by the Parent Association and helped with developing community spirit and interest in ECA outside of the school until March 13. Beginning April 29 each Wednesday ECA held six online Open House admissions interactions with potential parents which have sustained interest in the school. However, due to the uncertainty of the impact of the gasoline shortages and potential continued quarantine restrictions, many potential applicants indicated that they need to wait until August before making any commitment. As a result for the next academic year we expect to have a similar enrollment.

College Admissions: ECA continued with successful college admission placements with students being admitted to top colleges and universities in the United States of America (USA) and other countries. 100% of ECA graduates were accepted to one of their schools of choice. On average each senior had offers from at least 3 of their top university choices. For further information please refer to the Secondary School Counsellor’s University Report.

Professional Development: ECA faculty participated in Teacher Action and Growth (TAG) sessions each Wednesday afternoon. Thirteen ECA faculty members presented at the VANAS November conference at Colegio Internacional Caracas (CIC). Eight ECA faculty members were invited to give presentations at the Association of American Schools in South America (AASSA) annual conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil in March 2020, however this conference was cancelled due to Coronavirus pandemic travel restrictions. For further information please refer to the Professional Development Summary at the end of this annual report.

After School Activity Program: Up until March 13 the after school activity program operated with faculty (free activities) and outside (fee paying activities) contractors. Each contractor and teacher worked with students understanding the importance of child safety and with offering interesting, enjoyable activities. All contractors signed the required ECA Code of Conduct annual agreement and adhered to the policies and guidelines expressed in that document. Successful soccer, volleyball and basketball tournaments with schools in the Caracas area were held up until March 13.

March 16 to June 5 Online Distance Learning: With the Coronavirus pandemic quarantine restrictions in force, we were able to immediately switch from on campus “face to face” learning to online distance learning. After a two week adjustment, learning period we were able to modify instructional and communication techniques to efficiently function, professionally and positively interact with and support students and parents. During this time the community clearly demonstrated that ECA is indeed a continual learning organization – with creative ideas, innovation, motivation and professional work being achieved by ECA faculty and assistants in collaboration with the Administrative team.

Events: This year’s digital yearbook “Behind the Scenes” visually shows academic, social community interactions and general school life at ECA. Student Council, sports events, student performances, library activities, guest speakers, thanksgiving events, halloween, community service drives, field of toys, SAMUN/THIMUN, Venezuela day and digital art gallery and online interactions and presentations. These events clearly demonstrate that, under increasingly challenging circumstances, ECA continues to be an active, vibrant, active, positive, social and academic learning organization. Our thanks and congratulations go to Mr. Smee and his team of secondary school students for successfully finalizing the yearbook.

Concluding Remarks: ECA is an inclusive mixed ability school where all students work hard and are supported and motivated to academically realize their potential. Once again the annual report reaffirms the dedication, commitment and ongoing work that ECA faculty, assistants and staff complete with students to complete the aims of the annual school-wide goals.

This has been an unexpected challenging year for all schools worldwide. With the many events held, the re-accreditation self-study work, the MSA/CIS Team Visit in March 2020, COVID 19, the quarantine restrictions, social distancing, gasoline/other shortages, and with implementing instantaneous online learning …… we clearly demonstrated that we are a resilient, continual learning organization – the creative ideas, motivation and professional work of ECA faculty, together with parents, students and community support, all contributed to a very different yet successful year. On behalf of the ECA Board of Directors and ECA Faculty and staff, I thank the ECA parent community for their support during this academic year.

I wish departing community members well with their new learning destinations. I congratulate the Class of 2020 and wish them success with the future. As always I encourage graduates, departing faculty and families to keep in touch with each other and with Escuela Campo Alegre!

During the next academic year we intend to continue work with the ECA community, to maintain and further develop and improve on the quality education and community life that ECA offers.

On Campus…Online ……Anytime …….Anyway – ECA is Here to Stay” – Terry Christian – June 2020

Middle States Association (MSA) / Council of International Schools (CIS) Self-Study, Tean Visit – Re-accreditation Report


During September to November 2018 the school successfully prepared for the MSA and the CIS Preparatory Team Visit with “Candidate Status for MSA CIS Re-Accreditation” being granted in December 2018. Since that time faculty, assistants, staff and members of school community were involved in a comprehensive self study evaluation of all of the school’s operations in the following eight areas:

A) Purpose and Direction
B) Governance, Leadership and Ownership
C) The Curriculum
D) Teaching and Assessing for Learning
E) Student Learning and Well Being
F) Staffing
G) Premises and Physical Accommodation
H) Community and Home Partnerships

The Self-Study report was submitted in January 2020. During March 7 to 13 a team of experienced international educators visited ECA to meet with the community and verify the Self-Study report findings. As a result on May 12 we received the following notification:

“Following the recent Team Evaluation visit, I am pleased to let you know that CIS has completed its review of the Team Evaluation Report and awarded International Re-Accreditation to your school – allow me to be the first to congratulate you on this achievement. Rosanna de Kock CIS School Services Advisor.”

A summary of the main MSA/CIS Self-Study and Visiting Team Comments follows:
“The survey results highlighted numerous areas of perceived strength, most notably: the safe environment the school provides for children and in general for all members of the school community; the way in which students are engaged and challenged with their learning; the extensive use of technology to enhance learning; and the effective use of assessment to inform learning and teaching.”

“Escuela Campo Alegre is an inviting, vibrant, and welcoming learning environment, with a strong sense of community, genuine interest in student learning and well-being, fully aligned with the CIS accreditation drivers.”

“The cooperation and commitment to accreditation was a significant characteristic of the school before and during the visit. The evaluation team would like to thank: the students for always greeting us with a smile, and being genuinely interested in making us feel welcomed at all times; the teachers for welcoming us into their classes and sharing their interest and commitment to student learning; the faculty and the administration for their patience and rapid response in sharing information about the school when asked, and ensuring we were well taken care of at all times.”

“Curriculum in the ECE and elementary school is broad, balanced and sequenced in a way that enables student access and progression.”
“The whole curriculum is accessible to teachers via the school intranet.”

“The school’s curriculum design, teaching practices, and student learning reflect alignment to the school’s vision and mission. Teachers engage students, employing practices that serve to achieve the high-quality learning defined in the guiding statements”

“Commendations mainly relate to the development of a stimulating learning environment, the learning support provided to students, and the extensive and effective use of technology to enhance learning.”

“Commendations mainly relate to the overall level of openness, trust, and sense of belonging that members of the community experience for students and their families; the outstanding level of health education that is promoted in response to student needs; the high standard of written policies and procedures, as well as maintenance of premises and equipment, that clearly support the health, safety, and security of students, in line with the CIS driver of student well-being.”

“In conversations with students, most students indicated that they are very happy in the school, and remarked: “when you’re in this school you just forget about other problems (outside of the school)”.

“The school fosters students’ leadership and voice and has channels through which students can give input to the school regarding their learning and well-being.”

“Commendations primarily relate to the maintenance of regular and timely communications with parents through various channels, with regard to both student academic progress and in response to the changing and unpredictable local security situation.”

“Parents also mentioned that they appreciate the openness of the school and free access to the community.”

“The school has a strong performance appraisal system for faculty included in the Teacher Performance Appraisal System (TPAS) document that incorporates: unannounced and formal observations; mid-term and final year reports together with goal setting forms for each academic year that promote the improvement of teaching. Administrative and support staff are also evaluated yearly with the support staff performance calculator.”

“Commends the leadership team for hiring high-quality staff to support student learning, amidst the turbulent political and economic crises of the host country.”

“Our special thanks to the school superintendent, Mr.Terry Christian, who has led and maintained an institution of high standards, expectations, and aspirations during difficult times. Our thanks also to the accreditation coordinator Maria Matilde Salazar for her impeccable work and organization before and throughout the visit, and the school leadership team, namely Mark Pleasants, Michelle Till, and Francisco Hernandez for their leadership of the school and the guidance they provided to the evaluation team. Additionally, we recognize the significant contribution to the school’s development by the rest of the leadership team, including José Miguel Zapata, director of facilities, Martin Kattam, director of technology, and Julia Baranowsky, athletics director. Each gave generous time and thought so that discussions were open and friendly, focused and helpful.”

MSA/CIS Self Study Report General Recommendation Comments:
“In wishing to assist this process, this report identifies a number of recommendations that are thought to be of value to the school’s strategic planning; the most significant being the development of a more strategic professional development plan for staff and faculty in line with their recently developed guiding statements.”

“The report also identifies the need for ensuring curriculum development and resource deployment to be coherent and consistent with vertical articulation and alignment and the development of a clear roadmap for technology, storage of data with easy access of data for all faculty and staff.”

ECA’s GOALS FOR 2020-2021

 

Overarching School Wide Goal:
– Ensure successful implementation of the re-accreditation recommendations listed in the March 2020 MIddle States Association (MSA) and the Council of International Schools (CIS) Visiting Team Report.

ECA will also focus on the following four (4) school wide educational goals which provide further development of teaching and student learning at ECA:

1. Vertically and horizontally review and align curriculum to ensure teaching and student learning continuity.
2. Ensure the vertical mapping and integration of HATLs, the Campo Way, and Learner Profile into teaching and student learning.
3. Strategically prioritize faculty and staff professional development to further support and improve student learning.
4. Refine, align, and strengthen the use of distance learning opportunities so as to ensure continuity of student learning.

The ECA Board of Directors have identified the following eight strategic objectives which ECA shall focus on until June 2023:

1. Maintain, Develop and Improve the Quality of ECA’s International Education
2. Maintain, Develop and Improve Student Learning
3. Maintain/Increase Enrollment
4. Maintain and Develop a Like-Minded Supportive Community
5. Maintain Financial Independence and Provision for Emergency Situations
6. Keep Tuition Affordable
7. Continue to Collaborate and Interact with Other International Schools and Organizations
8. Maintain ECA’s International Accreditation Status

During the academic year 2020-2021 ECA shall continue to focus on:

– Fostering positive relationships with international university admission offices so that ECA graduates are able to continue to successfully transition to higher learning destinations which best fit their learning needs.

– Retaining and attracting the best qualified and committed international and local faculty.

– Developing the school website and effectively using social media sources to promote ECA and enhance communication, public relations and marketing.

ELEMENTARY PRINCIPAL’S REPORT – MICHELLE TILL


The school year 2019-2020 and specifically the final six months were productive yet challenging for the Elementary School. I am very proud of the elementary teaching team and the incredible work they have accomplished during this time.

1) In January, the Red Shirts moved to the ECE building which was a huge undertaking, made to look very easy by the careful, detailed planning of the red shirt teachers and assistants, Ms. Morena Christian, ECE Lead teacher, the technology team, Mr. Zapata and his team.

2) During the last week of January, the ES team completed the work on the MSA/CIS Self-Study report. This was another major undertaking requiring many collaborative planning meetings and an intensive document/evidence search.

3) In February and March the elementary team prepared for the MSA/CIS Team Visit. The week of the Team Visit was full of meetings, answering questions, being observed in our school environment and trying to share our learning community in a positive, realistic way. It was a very intense week but it was successfully completed on March 13.

4) During the afternoon of March 13, we also received notice of the first confirmed case of COVID 19 in Venezuela. On March 16, all schools in Venezuela were ordered to close and as a result ECA began online-learning. Online Learning presented significant challenges for ECA, particularly for the elementary faculty and assistants but, with the support of parents, students, teachers and staff, we were able to take “our show” online and continue to provide an supportive online learning environment for our students. Through collaboration, “blood, sweat, and tears” the elementary team proved to themselves, they can accomplish anything and that working together, we are stronger! We have achieved many accomplishments this year because in all of those events we have worked together, strengthened our relationships, built trust and empathy which will undoubtedly lead to school improvement and student success in the future.

The following is a summary of the current progress towards the identified school goals as they relate to the elementary school from August 2019 to May 2020.

During the COVID 19 pandemic, students, teachers, and parents had to quickly adapt to a virtual learning environment, away from our usual school routines, familiarity, personal interaction, and physical resources. I would like to commend all students, parents, and teachers/staff for their hard work and dedication during this time. The final 11 weeks would not have been possible without parental support and faculty and assistant teamwork.

In Trimester three progress towards the identified school wide goals was primarily focused on School Wide Goal #4 – Ensure that students and faculty effectively use technology, knowledge and skills to support student learning and growth. Also, a necessary area of focus and direction was on the emotional support and well being of our students, faculty/staff, and parents. The remaining three school wide goals were achieved through ongoing work completed earlier in the year

School Wide Goal #1 – Integrate explicit literacy instruction across all subjects

School Wide Goal #2 – Use varied standard based Performance Assessments so that students continue to have multiple ways to demonstrate successful learning.

School Wide Goal #3 – Use internal and external data analysis to improve student learning and growth.

Since August 2019 (Goals 1-3) were interwoven and addressed within our planning and instruction but they weren’t the primary focus during the last 11 weeks of online learning based on the considerations that as a collaborative team, we had discussions on the topic of “Maslow before Bloom” which is typically used to communicate how humans need their basic needs met before academic learning can be fully embraced. With students experiencing school-at-home during this COVID-19 pandemic, we focused on Wellness along with School wide goal #3.

SECONDARY PRINCIPAL’S REPORT – MARK PLEASANTS


The Secondary School principal worked with faculty to maximize student learning using effective international school teaching and learning practices. The secondary school have aligned Secondary School programs and curricula with the 2019-2020 school-wide goals:

School Wide Goal 1: Integrate explicit literacy instruction across all subjects. Secondary School teachers created effective literacy instruction for students that are individualized to the students being taught. During the COVID-19 quarantine we maintained a dynamic and stimulating online distance learning program which supported explicit literacy instruction.

English Language Learning (ELL) training was given to all Secondary School teachers. Also, the Student Support teachers have received online training to support ELL students. One example is an online course entitled Special Education Teaching Methods at Phoenix University in Phoenix, Arizona. Also, there were WIDA language self-paced eWorkshops that student support teachers completed throughout the year.

Concept based and inquiry based learning was further developed. Multiple professional learning sessions occurred during the academic year thus helping teachers better incorporate concept based learning and inquiry in their lessons and unit plans.

School Wide Goal 2: Use varied standard based ‘performance assessments’ so that students continue to have multiple ways to demonstrate successful learning. The principal worked individually with secondary teachers in supporting using appropriate assessments, use of rubrics, formative and summative techniques to best measure student learning.

The principal continued to regularly collaborate with the Secondary School Curriculum Coordinator to support this goal during weekly teacher professional development sessions. Faculty presentations have been made related to assessment that is aligned to and driven by student learning standards. Emphasis focused on offering a variety of summative and formative assessments to measure student learning.

This is the first year we successfully offered this and students positively participated in the Mathematics Olympiad, a competition between schools in the region. We hope to continue this into the future to support mathematics literacy at ECA. The mathematics schedules for grades 6, 7 and 8 were aligned within the same learning time. This allowed us to ensure that students were placed in the correct level of mathematics thus maximizing mathematics instruction.

School Wide Goal 3: Use internal and external data analysis to improve student learning and growth.  Further develop the use of MAP data to inform and improve student learning during the academic year 2019-2020. Further develop use of WIDA data to inform and improve student learning during the academic year 2019-2020.

The MSA/CIS Accreditation Visit involved secondary faculty in collecting, organizing and analysing valuable data to include in the Self-Study and to share with the Visiting Team. With student surveys on teachers, parent surveys, teacher surveys, much information was collected to help the school identity areas to improve organization and maximize student learning.

Regular professional development sessions on how to best incorporate Habits and Attitudes Towards Learning (HATLs) with assessments took place allowing for consistent, valuable learning data to be collected on each student. Teachers are now uniformly using HATLs to augment student learning in the Secondary School.

Data was collected from students regarding IB course choices. This year, we offered two new Group 4 (Experimental Sciences) courses: IB Computer Science and IB Environmental Systems & Societies. The IB Computer Science course came as a request from a group of grade 10 students from last year. Also, the IB Environmental Systems and Societies course was recommended as an option to help students who have difficulties in the traditional IB Physics, IB Chemistry and IB Biology courses.

Teachers included data goals in their Teacher Performance Appraisal System (TPAS) evaluations. The conversations with teachers regarding student and teacher survey results and other data points were valuable and helpful to further develop and improve instruction in the classroom.

School Wide Goal 4: Ensure that students and faculty effectively use technology, knowledge and skills to support student learning and growth. In terms of ECA’s technology philosophy the Secondary School followed the general document ‘ECA Technology Student Learning Integration’. However, due to Coronavirus and government quarantine restrictions, a new document and protocols were created, and shared with students and parents, outlining ECA’s online learning strategies. The implementation of ECA’s technology planning worked well for the secondary school. This was demonstrated by the smooth transition to online distance learning. Also, ECA technology continues to support a modern library and media center, technology centers for each division, robotics, electronics and programming, 3D printing, modeling, and augmented reality, campus-wide WIFI, interactive whiteboards, display projectors, and speakers.

The use of Schoology is standard in all Secondary School classes, and if students need to remain at home, in emergency situations, they can continue their learning using the Schoology platform. During the academic year ECA’s blended learning environment operated and functioned efficiently and reliably. Parent conferences and student performance assessments were conducted effectively during online learning.

The Secondary School Student Support Team (SST) and Counsellor effectively communicated and interacted with students during online learning. This was done through Google Hangouts, Google Classroom, WhatsApp calls or cell phones. Regular contact with students and when necessary parents allowed for effective communication supporting students academically, personally and socially.

Secondary School Counselor’s Report – Debbie Reed, LSC


1. Student Interactions: Interactions the counsellor has with students, family and community members, and staff are confidential. The role as a school counselor always encompasses the realms of college and career, personal/social, and academic support. This year the role has included: scheduling setup and individual student scheduling, individual student meetings for personal or social, academic, and career and college questions, student organization support, teacher meeting support, GPA and grading reference and checklists, transcript and records requests, parent/guardian meetings, administrative meetings, professional development webinars and conferences, IB staff and student meetings, PSAT administration and follow-up meetings, training with and use of BridgeU, the Coalition App, Common App,and UCAS, direct contact with post-secondary institutions via email, college rep chats, direct phone calls, and a university visit in the Netherlands with Model United Nations (MUN) students, writing and editing letters of recommendation and personal essays, career interest inventories, classroom guidance lessons, purging and requesting new standardized testing and university help books, small group meetings and mediation, individual counseling face-to-face and virtually via email and hangouts, and much more.

2. Presentations: Multiple presentations this year have included the following: Post-secondary transitions and considerations (parents and students), substance abuse info session planning and presentation with parents, students, doctors, college rep echats and in-person visits, THIMUN parent meeting and field trip planning and implementation, Grade 11 student facilitation with administration and staff, classroom guidance lessons, Life After High school exploration with high school, career interest inventory lessons with middle school, BridgeU and university classroom lessons with high school, Girls’ empowerment activity with elementary counselor, PSAT preparation and administration, Summer internship considerations presentation for parents, IB informational meeting and individual family meetings, and more.

Secondary School Counselor’s University Report – Class of 2020 Debbie Reed, LSC
What a pleasure it has been to work with the ECA Class of 2020! Not only do these students share a fun-loving and honest collective personality as a class but, individually, I have been impressed with their drive for information and clarification and quick-wit. It has truly been a joy to share their last year of school together.

My desire for all students is that they simply do something that is meaningful to them as individuals after high school. While some students wish to go directly to college, some might want an intentional gap year to prepare for further education. What matters most is that all are taking some kind of action to better support their future learning and career prospects. Whatever students do, they need to find the best fit for them that will challenge them to better themselves and challenge and equip them to impact the world in the ways they desire. This may include university attendance, full-time volunteering or internships, or simply taking a chance to immerse in a new language in a new country. All of these options show that students have chosen to take action and “do” rather than “wait”.

In the current environment of COVID-learning and with changes in the standard traditions of transitions from high school to college, our seniors have been faced with unforeseen difficulties and obstacles planning their next steps. I’m ever impressed with their ability to access information from universities, ask clear questions, and candidly discuss concerns with myself and other resources to understand the possibilities of what could happen in the future. Our seniors are faced with the difficult task to make critical decisions in a world that cannot provide them with the direct answers they need. As always, students and families should decide what is best for them in this world of unknowns.

It has been evident that this group of seniors were very motivated to find the best fit for them regarding higher educational opportunities. Students have utilized the counsellor’s knowledge by asking for help with applications and other admission considerations. We began to send transcripts and letters of recommendations for seniors in September 2019 and other staff and the secondary counsellor have continued to work with students to provide any resources needed.

Students applied to universities around the world. To date, transcripts for admission considerations have been sent to the United States of America, Canada, the United Kingdom, Spain, Switzerland, France, Venezuela, Lebanon, The Netherlands, Italy, and South Korea.

This number does not include post-secondary institutions that do not require mid-year or progress transcripts which, therefore, do not notify ECA about student applications. All of these applications are celebrated on a colorful bulletin board near the upperclassmen breezeway. As of early May, ECA students had identified and were evaluating well over 40 acceptances to universities worldwide. We are so excited to see the class of 2020 begin their next steps in their life and learning.

This year was the second year ECA has utilized College Representative Chats. After convening with other professional international school counselors and college admission representatives at CIS: Latin American Institute on Guidance in Florida in September, I was able to organize many electronic visits for students with college representatives from around the world using Skype and other communication platforms. Students and families were all invited to attend in grades 8-12 these sessions in the Fall and Spring. Additionally, I set up individual meetings with students and prospective universities as needed.

Students also utilized BridgeU to match with universities, organize applications, and apply. This is also the platform that is used to upload documents to universities through the Common Application and Coalition Application and other individual applications.

All senior information has been shared and discussed with Marc St. Laurent who will take over as secondary school counselor next year so he can support the class of 2021 and beyond. Thank you for the opportunity to serve our amazing students at ECA. It has truly been a pleasure.

Student reported University acceptances, at May 20 2020, include:

United States:
Babson College
Berklee College of Music
Bryant University
Central State University
Dakota College at Bottineau
Duke University
George Washington University
Michigan State University
Middle Georgia State University
Northeastern University
Northeastern University
Northeastern University
Penn State University
Penn State University
Penn State University
Purdue University
Suffolk University
Syracuse University
The Ohio State University
Tufts University
University of California-Berkeley
Penn State University
University of Houston
University of Maryland
University of Massachusetts
University of Texas at Austin
University of Washington

United Kingdom:
University of St. Andrews

Canada:
Concordia University
Dawson College
Laurier University
Ryerson University
Western University

Other Countries:
The American University of Paris (France)
Humanitas University (Italy)
Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore (Italy)
University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)
EU Business School Barcelona (Spain)

Athletics/Sports Report 2019-2020 – Julia Baranowsky – Athletic Director (AD)


The ECA athletics program went through some experimental trial changes during the 2019-2020 school year to coincide with the CAISSA tournament calendar. While the varsity teams did not travel to participate in the CAISSA tournaments, ECA participated in a tournament at Colegio Francia in girls volleyball and boys soccer, and ECA hosted 4 invitational tournaments over 4 weekends in girls volleyball and basketball, and boys soccer and basketball. During these tournaments, the community was incredibly supportive, from parents, teachers and students coming out to cheer on our athletes, as well as the US embassy and parent/staff teams participating. An intramural soccer tournament was held for the secondary school in September. Some tournaments were scheduled including intramural tournaments for basketball and volleyball, and an intercollegiate tournament with Colegio Francia, Colegio Internacional Caracas, and The British School Caracas, which were unable to be completed due to school closure for COVID-19.

Ties continued to be strengthened with the local sports community with clinics for the Middle School and Varsity sports teams where professional players and members of national teams supported our students and helped to build and improve on sport-specific skills.

ECA Invitational Tournaments
ECA was able to host 4 local invitational tournaments. During the first season, a girls volleyball and boys soccer tournament was held in October with 4 volleyball teams and 3 soccer teams; a girls basketball tournament was held in October with 4 teams; and a girls basketball and volleyball, and boys soccer tournament (ECAST) was held in November with 12 volleyball teams, 4 basketball teams and 5 soccer teams. In the second season, a boys basketball tournament was held in February with 6 teams participating. A tournament for girls soccer and boys volleyball was scheduled but did not run due to lack of interest from outside schools/clubs.

Caribbean Association of International Schools South America (CAISSA)
The varsity teams did not participate in the first season CAISSA tournament due to lack of participants. The second season CAISSA tournament was cancelled due to lack of participation from all CAISSA schools.

Looking ahead: Due to challenges in delivering the athletics program, caused by the difficulties in travelling in and outside of Venezuela, street demonstrations, electricity blackouts, water and gasoline shortages, planning and interaction with local school coaches, and COVID-19, some changes in the Athletic program will be made for next year. These changes are being made in order to best suit students’ needs and currently include:

– Providing In-house intramural sports tournaments (one for each sport)
– Providing 2 large tournaments at ECA following the successful ECAST model from 2019-2020
– Providing intercollegiate tournaments for both the High School and Middle School students
– Physical Education credit for sports team participation
– A 2-season practice model
– Semester 1: Girls’ volleyball and boys soccer
– Semester 2: Girls’ volleyball and boys soccer/basketball

CURRICULUM AND PROFESSIONAL LEARNING REPORT


1. Understanding By Design (UbD)
The two most important factors in ECA student learning are the richness of our curriculum and the quality of the teachers working in our classrooms with students. To ensure that the curriculum at ECA is relevant, engaging, aligned with our standards, and grounded in current research about how students learn best, a curriculum review action plan operates. Units of study are designed using the UbD process. This plan was designed to ensure that a clear scope and sequence in all subject areas (aligned to internationally recognized standards) is articulated and our units of study are designed “backwards” from our desired results.

This process involves faculty with learning about and implementing Teaching for Understanding and Understanding By Design and writing, peer review, teaching, sharing and reflecting on units of study. We use an Integrated activity based learning approach as defined by and aligned with the Common Core. Curriculum development and writing is an ongoing process at ECA. ECA provides professional development to support teachers with lesson planning and implementation.

2. Curriculum Documentation
ECA uses Google Drive to house curriculum documents, and a structure has been developed to ensure that ECA’s curriculum documents remain at ECA, in an organized and consistent structure, even after teachers and administrators leave. All ECA faculty and administrators accept that all curriculum materials developed and used at ECA remain here. All teachers have access to the ECA Curriculum Drive, and are expected to work within the grade level or departmental folders that have been established for them. Within these folders are three sub-folders where unit planners, assessment materials, and lesson plans and resources are stored. The Divisional Principals meet with faculty during their Teacher Performance Appraisal System (TPAS) meetings to determine curriculum writing outcomes and ensure that the written curriculum is being developed and documented, within the determined timelines, via the structures provided. Divisional Principals provide ongoing support for teachers with the curriculum documentation process so that the written curriculum evolves, and reflects what is actually taught in classrooms.

3. Assessment and Reporting
At ECA we believe assessment is an ongoing process aimed at understanding, improving and informing student learning. Assessment involves making expectations explicit and public, setting appropriate criteria and standards, systematically gathering, analyzing and interpreting evidence to determine how well performance matches expectations and results, and using the resulting information to document, explain and improve performance. Assessment for and of learning are key parts of the UbD unit design process. Once desired results are determined, assessment tasks are designed (before the teaching and learning sequence) to allow students opportunities to demonstrate their understanding of and competency in the desired results.

In the Secondary School key features of the Assessment Policy are the separation of Habits and Attitudes towards Learning (HATLs) from the Achievement grade, grading on a 1-7 scale against criterion referenced rubrics, and a focus on student learning growth. Prohibited by the assessment policy are the use of percentages, giving zeros, having more than two assessment tasks per day, and assigning assessed work as homework. In the Secondary School, grading is criterion referenced, and on a 1-7 scale. Mid-semester and semester reports are each issued twice a year. Teachers issue grades four times per year for all students, and comments for all students at the end of each semester. Comments are also written for students who are underachieving on the mid-semester reports.

In the Elementary School students are assessed against our standards and performance is reported via a scale of 1-4 at the end of each trimester. Informative comments are written as a part of each report.

The policies and practices of the assessment policy are commonly practiced across the school, and the Divisional Principals and the curriculum representatives work with faculty to ensure that the assessment policy is appropriately and fairly implemented and communicated to students and parents.

Connected with the assessment policy is a school-wide Homework Policy. The ECA Homework policy sets appropriate limits and outlines the criteria for assigning meaningful homework designed to improve student learning. Homework does not count towards achievement grades.

4. Teacher Action and Growth (TAG) and Professional Learning
Professional Learning at ECA is an ongoing developmental process and involves a structured balance of in-house activities/experiences outside consultants, and attendance at workshops and conferences in the Americas.

In November 2019, all ECA faculty and assistants attended Colegio Internacional Caracas (CIC) together with over 250 teachers from seven other international schools, located in Venezuela, at the annual VANAS 2019 Teachers’ Conference. Thirteen ECA faculty members successfully gave professional presentations at this conference.

Teacher Action and Growth (TAG) time on Wednesday afternoons is dedicated to professional learning related to annual school-wide goals. In addition TAG time was used for Teachers Teaching Teachers (TTT) workshops, peer review of UbD units, curriculum articulation meetings, book clubs, online courses, divisional Meetings as well as MSA/CIS accreditation Self -Study preparation. In May 2020 a TAG survey was conducted for returning ECA teachers to reflect on this year’s TAG schedule, and to help determine the best use of TAG time next year. School-wide goals for the next academic year are determined and the leadership team uses the faculty feedback and the recommendation from the MSA/CIS report to prepare a TAG calendar and a professional development plan for the next academic year.

During TAG time we also preview teacher presenter workshops of those who applied to present at the annual AASSA Educators’ Conference. We select and propose ECA presenters to give workshops, representing ECA, and to participate at the AASSA Educators’ Conference.

TECHNOLOGY REPORT – DIRECTOR OF TECHNOLOGY – MARTIN KATTAM

At ECA we leverage technology to:

● Improve academic performance
● Increase student engagement and motivation
● Expand access to knowledge
● Provide resource efficiency and cost savings

Our approach to technology integration was based on a Blended Learning model [1], research based, and guided by International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) [2] and Common Core Standards [3].

This year we continued to develop the appropriate integration of Technology to improve and enhance teaching and student learning. We deepened and increased use of blended learning with success, to offer online learning during the coronavirus quarantine. We successfully transitioned to online learning during the months of the quarantine when students could not physically attend school. We worked to provide support for Principals to use digital assessment and our school technology platforms more effectively. We worked industriously to empower and provide increased technology independence of skills among faculty and administrative assistants in the elementary and secondary school offices. We developed electronic tutorials for faculty and staff with a focus toward more visual explanations, and this was received with positive feedback.

To ensure a seamless classroom digital experience for students and faculty, we worked with the Superintendent to protect and provide a high-quality internet experience for our students, faculty and community in the face of increasing budgetary pressures. With fewer technology staff, than before, and with reduced costs we have been able to continue to develop the ECA technology user experience this year for students, staff and the community.

Our Technology Integration Facilitator (TIF) assists faculty in both divisions to enhance teaching and learning through improved integration of technology. The TIF works with instructional faculty to integrate technology into their teaching. The TIF has also co-taught lessons that are planned together with teachers. The TIF effectively supported faculty and student learning, including ensuring efficiency so that, in emergency situations such as those experienced during the quarantine, we were able to transition and support student learning to all online seamlessly.

This year we continued to participate in the Hour of Code and Digital Citizenship week. Coding literacy continues across all of elementary school and is available in Secondary. In addition, we had Robotics, programming, electronics, augmented and virtual reality, digital video and photography, and 3d modeling, producing event publications and programs, yearbook production and printing. These are all technology activities that provide rich deep student learning experiences and an enriched exploration of Technology for ECA students.

This year we participated in and completed the MSA/CIS Self-Study re-accreditation process, and the ECA Technology team and Technology Integration was one of the areas that received major commendations in the Visiting Team report.

[1] https://www.teachthought.com/learning/12-types-of-blended-learning/
[2] https://www.iste.org/standards/for-students
[3] https://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/exactly-what-the-common-core-standards-say-about-technology/

LIBRARY/MEDIA CENTRE REPORT – April Pleasants


The library aligned this year’s curriculum and programs to the 2019-2020 school-wide goals.

A) School Wide Goal 1: Integrate explicit literacy instruction across all subjects. The library carried various literacy programs and events this year (from twelve programs and activities last year to thirty-five this year). More teachers and parents partnerships and collaborations were established and it is expected that this will continue during the next school year.

B) School Wide Goal 2: Use varied standard-based Performance Assessments so that students continue to have multiple ways to demonstrate successful learning. This year, the library adapted to the American Association of School Libraries (AASL) Standards. With all the programs and events completed this year, the library met several of these standards in supporting teaching and learning at Escuela Campo Alegre.

C) School Wide Goal 3: Use internal and external data analysis to improve student learning and growth. The library implemented ways to analyse the reading patterns of students by collecting information on the amount of library interactions from the Elementary School and Secondary School students. The elementary school has at least an average of 2-3 visits in a week, while the secondary school has a total of 1,301 students library engagements. Furthermore, the library’s total circulation from August to March is 9,031 on reading materials and 384 on AV equipment for this year. Also, a full inventory of library resources was completed with 30,241 materials accounted for and circulated in the library. We also conducted a Library Survey in May to gather information from students, parents, and faculty on how we can improve into the future.

D) School Wide Goal 4: Ensure that students and faculty effectively use technology, knowledge and skills to support student learning and growth. The library carried out several community information sessions regarding the use of the library catalog, Destiny and how to use and access the library databases throughout the year. The MakerSpace area continued to provide excitement with additional student exposures to educational board and card games this year.

In summary, the library will further to develop its programs next year and further align with the school’s academic curriculum standards with AASL standards, and this will ensure that the ECA Library remains as the ‘hub’ for teaching and learning at Escuela Campo Alegre under the leadership of a new Library Director.

Education Committee Report
School Wide Goals Elementary School Secondary School Library Services
Overall Educational Goal: Obtain a successful outcome from the Middle States Association (MSA) and the Council of International Schools (CIS) Visiting Team Re-accreditation planned for March 2020.

MSA/CIS Team Visit March 9 to 13 – Re Accreditation Achieved on May 12, 2020

“Following the recent Team Evaluation visit, I am pleased to let you know that CIS has completed its review of the Team Evaluation Report and awarded International Re-Accreditation to your school – allow me to be the first to congratulate you on this achievement. Rosanna de Kock CIS School Services Advisor.”

The entire Elementary school diligently and collaboratively continued revising, updating and developing the curriculum using the Understanding by Design model.       

All Elementary Teachers and teaching assistants contributed to rewriting the school’s guiding statements and with participating in  the MSA/CIS Domain C, D and E committee curriculum, assessment and student well being meetings and with writing the Self Study reports.

The entire Secondary school  diligently and collaboratively continued revising, updating  and developing the curriculum using the Understanding by Design model.     

All Secondary Teachers and teaching assistants contributed to rewriting the school’s guiding statements and with participating in  the MSA/CIS Domain C, D and E committee curriculum, assessment and student well being meetings and with writing the Self Study reports.

The Library staff diligently and collaboratively worked to ensure that accreditation goals were achieved.

Library staff contributed to rewriting the school’s guiding statements and with participating in the MSA/CIS Domain C, D, E and other committees and with writing the Self Study reports.

Goal 1. Integrate explicit literacy instruction across all subjects. Until March 13 this goal was achieved and interwoven and addressed within our general lesson planning, classroom and library instruction and with Writers’ workshop activities. 

As a collaborative team, we held lengthy discussions on the topic of “Maslow before Bloom” which is typically used to communicate how humans need their basic needs met before academic learning can be fully embraced. With students experiencing school-at-home during this COVID-19 pandemic, we focused on student health and wellness along with School wide goal #3. As a result beginning March 16 the primary focus was on supporting students, parents and faculty personally, socially and emotionally.

Secondary School teachers created effective individualized literacy instruction for students.

The Secondary School worked during the COVID-19 pandemic to maintain a dynamic and stimulating online distance learning program for students to support explicit literacy instruction. 

ELL training was given to all Secondary School teachers.

Student Support teachers received online ELL training with the online course entitled Special Education Teaching Methods from the Phoenix University in Arizona. 

Also, there were WIDA self-paced eWorkshops that SST teachers took throughout the year.

The library carried out various literacy programs and events this year (from twelve programs and activities last year to thirty-five this year).

More teachers and parents partnerships and collaborations were established and it is hoped that this will continue during the next school year.

Goal 2. Use varied standard based Performance Assessments so that students continue to have multiple ways to demonstrate successful learning. Until March 13 this goal was achieved and interwoven and addressed within our general lesson planning, classroom and instruction with evaluating internal teacher class assessment material and with analysing MAP and WIDA testing data.

As a collaborative team, we held lengthy discussions on the topic of “Maslow before Bloom” which is typically used to communicate how humans need their basic needs met before academic learning can be fully embraced. With students experiencing school-at-home during this COVID-19 pandemic, we focused on student health and wellness along with School wide goal #3. As a result beginning March 16 the primary focus was on supporting students, parents and faculty personally, socially and emotionally. 

The Secondary principal worked with specific SS teachers supporting appropriate assessments, use of rubrics, formative and summative techniques to best measure student learning.

The principal collaborated with the Secondary Curriculum Coordinator to support this goal through ongoing teacher professional development  

Presentations to faculty have focused on assessment aligned to and driven by performance assessment standards. 

Emphasis has been on offering a variety of summative and formative assessments to support and measure student learning.

We successfully offered the Venezuelan Mathematics Olympiad competition. 

Middle School Math 6, Math 7, and Math 8 were scheduled to occur at the same time. This ensured that students were placed in the correct level of mathematics to maximize their mathematics instruction.

The library adapted to the American Association of School Libraries (AASL) Standards. 

With all the programs and events carried out this year, the library met several of these AASL standards in supporting teaching and learning at Escuela Campo Alegre.

Goal 3. Use internal and external data analysis to improve student learning and growth. Until March 13 this goal was achieved and interwoven and addressed within our general lesson planning, classroom and instruction with evaluating internal teacher class assessment material, behavior log and student support information and with analysing MAP and Wida testing data.

As a collaborative team, we held lengthy discussions on the topic of “Maslow before Bloom” which is typically used to communicate how humans need their basic needs met before academic learning can be fully embraced. With students experiencing school-at-home during this COVID-19 pandemic, we focused on student health and wellness along with School wide goal #3. As a result beginning March 16 the primary focus was on supporting students, parents and faculty personally, socially and emotionally. 

The MSA/CIS Accreditation Self Study involved secondary faculty with collecting, organizing and analysing valuable learning data. 

With student surveys related to teachers, parent surveys, and teacher performance surveys, much information was collected to help the school identity areas to improve organization and maximize student learning. 

Teacher, Action & Growth (TAG) sessions on how to best incorporate HATLs with assessments occurred, and this allowed for consistent and valuable learning data to be collected on each student. Teachers use HATLs to support and augment student learning.

Data was collected from students regarding IB course choices. This year, we offered two new Group 4 (Experimental Sciences) courses: IB Computer Science and IB Environmental Systems & Societies. The IB Computer Science course came as a request from a group of grade 10 students last year. The IB Environmental Systems & Societies course was recommended by several ECA science teachers to help students who have difficulties in the traditional IB Physics, IB Chemistry and IB Biology courses.

Teachers included data goals in their TPAS evaluations. The conversations with teachers regarding teacher survey results and other data points were valuable and helpful to improve instruction in the classroom.

The library implemented ways to analyse the reading patterns of students by collecting information on the amount of library interactions from the Elementary School and Secondary School students.

This year, ES has at least an average of 2-3 visits in a week, while the SS has a total of 1,301 students library engagements. 

Furthermore, the library’s total circulation from August to March is 9,031 on reading materials and 384 on AV equipment for this year. 

A full inventory of library resources was completed with 30,241 materials accounted for and circulated in the library. 

We also conducted a Library Survey in May 2020 to gather information from students, parents, and faculty on how to improve Library services for the future

Goal 4. Ensure that students and faculty effectively use technology, knowledge and skills to support student learning and growth During the COVID -19 pandemic, students, teachers, and parents had to quickly adapt to a virtual learning environment, away from our usual school familiarity, presence, routine, and physical resources. 

Also, a necessary area of focus and direction was on the emotional support and well being of our students, faculty/staff, and parents.

Commendations go to all students, parents, and teachers/staff for their hard work and dedication during this time. The final 11 weeks of school would not have been possible without the outstanding teamwork and collaboration demonstrated by the ECA community.

The Secondary school followed the school’s Technology Student Learning Integration protocols.

However, due to the COVID-19 government quarantine measures, we revised operating guidelines and communicated these to the community. This helped students, parents and teachers support each other to maximize student distance learning during March 16 to June 5 when a smooth secondary school transition to online distance learning occurred. 

Technology at ECA is supported by a modern library and media center, technology centers for each division, robotics, electronics and programming, 3D printing, modeling, and augmented reality, campus-wide WIFI, interactive whiteboards, display projectors, and speakers. 

The Secondary School was ready for distance learning when it was needed. The use of Schoology is standard in all Secondary School classes, and if students need to remain at home in emergency situations, they can continue their learning using the Schoology platform. 

It is important to ensure that ECA’s blended learning environment operates and functions efficiently and reliably. 

Performance assessments and parent conferences were conducted effectively during online learning.

The Secondary School Student Support team and Counsellor effectively communicated and interacted with students during online learning. This was effected through Google Hangouts, Google Classroom, WhatsApp calls or using mobile/cell phones. Regular contact with students occurred and when necessary with parents which allowed for effective communication and support of students academically, personally and socially.

The library carried out several faculty, staff and parent information sessions regarding the use of the library catalog, Destiny and how to use and access the library databases throughout the year. 

The MakerSpace program continued to further develop excitement with additional student exposures to educational board and card games this year. 

In summary, the library will continue and develop  its programs next year and further align the school’s academic curriculum standards with AASL Standards, and this will ensure that the ECA Library remains as the ‘hub’ for supporting teaching and learning at Escuela Campo Alegre.

Finance Committee Report
Critical Success Factors and Key Performance Indicators 2019-20 Focus Comments & Achievements Status
A. Establish an annual financial plan

Key Performance Indicators

  1. Annual Review Strategic direction/plan to be presented to the Board of Directors for approval. 
  2. Monitor the implementation of the strategic plan to ensure it is articulated into the Finance Committee functions.
  3. Further develop the admissions & marketing Plan 
Positive Promotion of ECA

  • Planning for Admissions & Marketing 
  • Review the financial strategic plan and make changes accordingly.
  • Continue to host Open House events and positively promote ECA.
  • Increase enrollment.  Continue to look for ways to attract new families using ECA community contacts, social and cultural events, and media participation.
  • Continue with Mini Olympic and interactive events
We are financially planning one year at a time with regular oversight of enrollment and tuition fees, overall finances, budget parameters and  control of expenses. 

During the year, the Committee reviewed financial mechanisms to cover any possible cash deficit. 

During 2019-2020, a strategic plan which included admission and marketing plan was presented to the Finance Committee at the meeting on November 22, 2019.  The plan incorporated: marketing involving a series of events and interactions with the ECA and wider public: open houses, developing our social media presence, promoting school events, a theater production of Mamma Mia, parents’ events, the Superintendent and the Admissions Director visiting preschools, embassies, and corporations during the year. 

Until March 13, we held two well attended open houses, we organized and were about to present a schoolwide community production of the musical Mamma Mia (which was almost sold out), held two large successful sports events, had contact with Chevron and the Indian Embassy, regularly published on Instagram and other social media which were updated on a weekly basis showing ECA’s achievements, mission and vision, learning values and benefits of attending ECA.

Due to the Covid-19 Quarantine, there were some events planned for the second semester that were not able to be completed such as the Mini Olympics, Mamma Mia presentations, On campus open houses, and preschool, embassy and corporation visits. However, we have successfully hosted weekly online Open House presentations since April 29 – this will continue to June 10 and beyond. 

As part of the strategic financial plan, the fee structure was reviewed in April 2020, increasing siblings’ discounts to maintain the current population and be more attractive for new students.

Completed
B. Ensure the design and delivery of a financing plan for operations and physical expansion.

Key Performance Indicators

  1. Prepare operations and capital budget for the year.
  2. Review Capital Plan
  3. Review investment policy
  4. Monitor investments
  5. Review invoicing procedures
  • Maintain regular Finance Committee review of ECA finances
  • Continue to positively promote ECA to increase enrollment
Operational and capital budgets for the school year 2020-21 were approved by the Board in April 2020. Both, operational and capital budget, and cash flow were reviewed by the Finance Committee monthly. 

The Finance Committee decided not to do any major capital projects except for those needed to keep the school running safely and effectively. Capital projects were presented to the Finance Committee and to the full Board for approval.

The investment performances were reviewed two times during the year with the investment’s advisors and every month, a summary of investments and performance was presented to the Committee. 

Completed
C. Oversee budgeting, reporting and external auditing process.

Key Performance Indicators

  1. Monthly budget reports.
  2. Complete yearly external audit
  3. Review internal controls and financial statements.
Maintain regular Finance Committee review of ECA finances Monthly cash flow reports were presented to the Finance Committee. 

During March and April, 2020, the Committee reviewed all budget expenses line by line, looking for savings.  Resizing of school will be reviewed in the short term.

The External Audit Report is in progress and it is expected, as previous year, to result in having a qualified opinion because ECA needs an updated appraisal of its infrastructure.

Completed
D. Oversee the design, reporting and presentation of the Management Information System.

Key Performance Indicators

  1. Annual review of revenue sources.
  2. Maintain a variety of enrollment scenarios and their financial implications.
  3. Ensure elements are in place to attract and retain outstanding teachers.
  4. Determine alternate financial indicators for economic local salary adjustments.
  5. Ensure that local salaries/benefits are competitive with other International and local schools in Venezuela
  6. Report of facilities use – revenue versus maintenance costs
Maintain regular Finance Committee review of ECA finances In April 2020 and as part of the budget process for next school year, the Finance Committee extensively reviewed expenses, different budget scenarios considering: lower enrollment, a combination of currencies for tuition collection, inflation, school headcount in order to determine the financial impact of a worst case scenario for the next academic year.

In September and November 2019, the HR Committee and Finance Committee reviewed the overall salary and benefits of ECA’s local employees.

In August 2019, October 2019, and March 2020, ECA participated in salary surveys with other 8 local schools to review packages. In the last survey made in March 2020, ECA local faculty was in percentile 75 compared with the other 8 local schools.  The salary package for local teachers was significantly improved with an increase of the annual performance bonus.

On a monthly basis the Finance Committee, Human Resources committee and the Board reviewed the status of the salaries and benefits of local employees to be competitive.

ECA has in place a regular, robust process for identifying salary increases considering school budget, inflation, and performance. Salary increases, monthly bonuses and other payments were reviewed and established to ensure that ECA was competitive within the local market.

The overseas salary and benefits package was reviewed, and no changes were made as this is still currently competitive for similar international schools in South America. 

During the budget process we reviewed the cost/benefit of having the facilities rented. This will be further reviewed in detail at future Finance Committee meetings.

Completed
 E. Oversee internal controls, safeguarding ECA assets, and authorizations.

Key Performance Indicators

  1. Annual meeting with auditors.
  2. Ensure appropriate protection of school assets.
Maintain existing control processes & protocols Authorization procedures to remove assets from the facilities were reviewed and are functioning effectively.  Any assets need Director of Support Services (DSS) or Superintendent approval to leave the school. Partially completed. The annual meeting with auditors is pending.
Human Resources Committee Report
Critical Success Factors and Key Performance Indicators 2019-20 Focus Comments & Achievement Status
A. We have outstanding and effective faculty and administrative staff

Key Performance Indicators:

  1. Ensure a structured performance management tool is in place
  2. A defined matrix is in place for the teacher evaluation tool, with built in ability to move the standard higher.
  3. Criteria for evaluation balanced between objective and subjective are uniformly administered.
  4. There is clear evidence that actions are taken on the basis of evaluations reports, where appropriate.
Assure attraction and retention of the best professionals. New faculty adapted quickly and successfully to ECA  

Teacher and Administrator Performance Appraisal System (TPAS & APAS) reviewed and completed 

Superintendent meets weekly with Principals to plan, review administrative matters, curriculum and student learning progress and teacher performance.

MSA/CIS Accreditation team was impressed with ECA faculty commitment, work ethic, effort and ECA’s comprehensive professional development and appraisal (TPAS) system.

MSA/CIS review shows ECA has an effective process for monitoring/tracking and evaluating teacher performance during the academic year.

During the Coronavirus quarantine time (March 16 to June 5), ECA successfully provided a high quality of  online learning for students.

In addition the technology operational support provided demonstrated the  capacity of the school to fully support online and face to face learning given the professional, responsible commitment of ECA  faculty, assistants and staff.

Achieved and Completed
B. Teachers are fulfilled, motivated and professionally challenged

Key Performance Indicators:

  1. Interviews and focus groups provide correlating data.
  2. A professional enrichment program is in place.
  3. Orientation program is perceived as effective in surveys.
  4. Housing & housing policy are perceived as fair.
Review housing improvement opportunities basically, internet services. The MSA/CIS accreditation team recognize that across the school ECA faculty provide stimulating student involvement – “A vibrant safe environment can be felt once you enter the school.”

The following community surveys were operating during the school year: ECA New Faculty Orientation Overseas Faculty Survey,  Overseas Housing Survey completed on schedule. The majority of surveys showed above average ratings better than than for previous years.  

During February/March 2020 ECA parents, students, faculty completed  MSA/CIS surveys which showed improved rating than previous years in all areas. Summary Survey draft data were presented to the ECA Board and are available in Board documentation folders.

Achieved and Completed
C. Pay and benefit package is competitive with other opportunities

Key Performance Indicators:

    1. Top quartile performers are at 75% quartile of market survey
  • Performance base pay plan is developed and in place and evaluated
Market salary review.

Review local packages, positions, and employees’ groups as part of the ECA’s Strategic Plan.

Implementing support staff and maintenance performance evaluations.

In November 2019, the Committee reviewed the contracts and benefits for overseas Faculty. 

The overseas  package continues to be competitive with comparable  international schools in South America.

In September and November 2019, the HR Committee and Finance Committee reviewed the overall salary and benefits of ECA’s local employees.

In August 2019, October 2019 and March 2020, ECA participated in salary surveys with 8 local schools to review packages. In the last survey made in March 2020, ECA local faculty was located in percentile 75 compared with the other 8 local schools.  

On a monthly basis the Finance Committee and the Board reviewed the status of the salaries and benefits of local employees to be competitive, increases were awarded accordingly. 

ECA has in place a regular, robust process for identifying salary increases considering school budget,  inflation and performance. Salary increases, monthly bonuses and other payments. 

Achieved and Completed
D. Staff development and training program is in place, which supports  ECA’s Vision and curricular program

Key Performance Indicators:

  1. A professional development program is in place.
  2. Annual staff development survey correlates with the Vision.
  3. Annual budget supports training adequately.
  4. Report from the Education & Policy Committee on implementation of training in classrooms reflects that training has been effective.
Maintain a high quality of learning by ensuring professional development is linked to school wide educational goals The MSA/CIS accreditation Visiting Team was impressed for the effort shown in providing and  implementing a thorough, detailed, comprehensive professional development and appraisal (TPAS) system. 

The MSA/CIS Visiting Team were very impressed with the level of detail, class visits and student survey data seen.

ECA teachers regularly participated in a variety of different training and professional development courses and workshops during 5 professional development days built into the school calendar and during the weekly Teacher Action & Growth (TAG) program. 

All professional development was aligned with ECA’s mission, vision statements and the annual educational goals for 2019-2020.

All ECA faculty and assistants attended the VANAS 2019 Educators’ conference in Colegio International Caracas (CIC).

8 ECA faculty were selected to give presentations at the AASSA Conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil; however, due to Coronavirus, the conference was cancelled. 

In November, April and May the Board’s Education Committee received detailed written, educational reports from the Principals  and the Superintendent related to program status and teacher/student learning.

All MSA/CIS accreditation, curriculum documentation  and reports  have been updated and are available on the school’s Google Drive.

Achieved and Completed
E. Ensure elements are in place to attract and retain outstanding teachers

Key Performance Indicators:

    1. Recruitment practices are reviewed annually
    2. Retention measures are in place and reviewed annually
Retain and recruit well qualified professional educators. This school year has the lowest turnover rate of teachers. 6 overseas teachers decided to leave at the end of the school year.  

Given the quarantine situation due to  Coronavirus, lack of gasoline, and other security situations caused by the complex, political, social and economic situation in Venezuela, it has been a successful year for ECA regarding teacher’s retention and permanence in Caracas and their dedication to ECA and student learning during March 16 to June 5.

In the case of local faculty and staff, 2 faculty left the school at end of the academic year.

The salary and benefits package for local employees were regularly reviewed and established to be competitive in the local market and be able to attract and retain well qualified  professionals.

Achieved and completed
F. Security practices promote a sense of well-being and provide a clear sense of what will enhance security personal behaviors

Key Performance Indicators: 

    1. An annual review of security breaches is held using both internal & external statistics.
    2. Orientation & training programs are in place.
    3. Procedures are in place for the range of security risks
Review physical security plan as part of the school’s strategic plan.

Prepare for no security breaches during the year.

The ECA security emergency manual was reviewed by the Committee. 

11 Overall emergency drills were held as follows: 

Two (2) Earthquake, seven (7) fire and two (2) lockdown drills were performed during the year as part of the security training program.

Emergency and evacuation decision making Protocols for School Closure were fully reviewed, updated and approved by the full ECA Board in March 2019

The MSA/CIS Community survey results indicate that ECA is perceived as a safe environment for students and the community. 

Achieved and Completed
G. A short and long term Strategic Plan for the school is in place

Key Performance Indicators: 

  1. Develop a strategic plan school wide by the end of the school year.
  2. Procedures are in place to assure implementation of the strategic plan
Ensure that the ECA plan is flexible to adapt to the rapidly changing  Venezuelan political, social and economic environment. During the year, the HR Committee further reviewed the organizational chart of the school, headcount, packages by person or groups of employees, retention and succession planning for the Superintendent. Achieved and Completed

ECA Professional Development Summary 2019-2020

VANAS Conference Presentations – Colegio International (CIC), Caracas Venezuela – November 2019

  • Marianna Tuozzo & Ana Nouel – Trauma Informed Education
  • Julia Baranowsky Wellness in the Workplace – Making Teacher Wellbeing A Priority 
  • Marie Claire Sanz & Isabel Angeli – Integrating Writers Workshop in the Native and Foreign Language Program to Enhance Classroom Literacy
  • Adam Smee & Paulita Rodriguez – Design for the Future: Leave it in the hands of the kids.
  • Nitha Jaimes – Learning support for ELL students in a Latin American International Schools Environment
  • Clementina Vera Perez – The Gifted Student: Beliefs, Detection & Strategies
  • Erik Lamb – Using simulations in the classroom 
  • Andreina Joy Perez – Solid ground for creativity: structure 
  • Esteban Isasi – Physics Theater
  • Matt Sheets – Reaching all Humanities Learners through differentiation. 

Other Workshops and Conferences Attended

  • Carla Layug: Reading and Writing Institute – Teachers’ College Reading and Writing Project (TCRWP) – Columbia University, USA   
  • April Pleasants: Teachers College Reading Workshop – TCRWP – Columbia University, USA   
  • Terry Christian: AASSA Educational Administrators’ Annual Conference, Miami, USA
  • Debbie Reed: CIS Latin America Institute on International Admissions and Guidance, Florida, USA
  • Sabina Slezak – WIDA – International School Consortium. WIDA Institute provides training to teachers for using the WIDA assessment tools – Medellin, Colombia 
  • Nitha Jaimes – WIDA – International School Consortium. WIDA Institute provides training to teachers for using the WIDA assessment tools – Medellin, Colombia 
  • Mayra Truyol – WIDA – International School Consortium. WIDA Institute provides training to teachers for using the WIDA assessment tools – Medellin, Colombia 
  • April Pleasants – American Association of School Librarians Annual Conference – Louisville, Kentucky, USA 

IB Online Training

  • James Gathu – IB Online Workshop Computer – August 2019 – Science (Cat. 2)
  • Matt Pearce – IB Online Workshop Online – October 2019 – Biology (Cat. 2)
  • Esteban Isasi – IB Online Workshop Online – October 2019 Mathematics: Applications and Interpretation (Cat.2)
  • Cynthia Abdallah – IB Online Workshop Online – October 2019 – English A: Language and Literature (Cat. 2)
  • Esteban Isasi – IB Online Workshop – August 2019 – Language B (Generic) (Cat. 2)
  • Jurac Radah – IB Online Workshop – August 2019 – Language A: Language and Literature (Generic) (Cat. 2)
  • Adam Smee – IB Online Workshop Online – November 2019 – English A: Language and Literature (Cat. 2)
  • Luz Carrascosa – IB Online Workshop Online – November 2019 – Language B (Generic) (Cat. 2)
  • Maria Plaza – IB online Workshop – February 2020 – Visual Arts (Cat. 2)
  • Matt Sheets – IB Online Workshop – May 2020 – Economics (Cat. 2)
  • Erik Lamb – IB Online Workshop – May 2020 – Theory of Knowledge (Cat. 2)

Other Online Courses

  • Clementina Vera Perez – Trauma Informed Positive Behaviour Support. Practical and Proven Strategies for Challenging Behaviour.
  • Marianna Tuozzo – Trauma Informed Positive Behaviour Support. Practical and Proven Strategies for Challenging Behaviour.
  • Maria Eugenia Vicentini – Lively Letters Full Training Live – Reading with TLC   
  • Patricia Mata – Lively Letters Full Training Live – Reading with TLC  
  • Oscar Douahi – Lively Letters Full Training Live – Reading with TLC  
  • Isabel Angeli – Lively Letters Full Training Live – Reading with TLC 
  • Morena Christian – Lively Letters Full Training Live – Reading with TLC 
  • Marianna Tuozzo – Lively Letters Full Training Live – Reading with TLC 
  • Maria Isabel Carballo – Lively Letters Full Training Live – Reading with TLC 
  • Svetlana Loginow – Lively Letters Full Training Live – Reading with TLC 
  • Carla Layug – Lively Letters Full Training Live – Reading with TLC 
  • Isabel Angeli – Introduction to Heggerty Phonemic Awareness for Individual Educators and Parents.
  • Marianna Tuozzo – Introduction to Heggerty Phonemic Awareness for Individual Educators and Parents.
  • Maria Eugenia Vicentini – Introduction to Heggerty Phonemic Awareness for Individual Educators and Parents.
  • Patricia Mata – Level 2 Certificate in Understanding Autism
  • Julia Baranowsky – Introduction to the Mindful Classroom – The Art & Science of Well-Being for Staff and Students – San Diego University, USA
  • Steffi James – Teaching and Learning Through Inquiry by Kath Murdoch
  • Scott Mackenzie – Teaching and Learning Through Inquiry by Kath Murdoch
  • Andrein Joy Perez De Ramirez – Art Education Flexibility
  • Morena Christian – Understanding ADHD: Current Research and Practice – University of Bath, UK
  • Morena Christian – Good Practice in Autism Education – University of Bath, UK
  • Stuart Tourle  – You Cubed “How to Learn Math for Teachers.”